Victoria Park Road Low Traffic Neighbourhood

What is a low traffic neighbourhood?

A low traffic neighbourhood is a group of residential streets, bordered by main roads (used by buses, lorries and non-local traffic travel), where through motor vehicle traffic is discouraged or removed using road closures. Every resident can drive onto their street and deliveries can be made, but it’s harder or impossible to drive straight through from one main road to the next.

What measures could be introduced?


Option A – Remove current experimental junction closure. This would mean that there wouldn’t be any measures to create a low traffic neighbourhood.

Option B – Keep current experimental junction closure at its current location. If it is decided to keep this measure in its current location, the temporary planters, road markings and signage can be upgraded to be made permanent.

Option C - Move closure to the other side of Namu Road (shown in figure 1 on the map). This would create less conflict with vehicles exiting Namu Road and would also provide more opportunity for a landscaped closure if made permanent.

Option D - Closure on Victoria Park Road near Namu Road (option B or C) and add additional closure on the junction of Vicarage Road and Morden Road (shown in figure 2 on the map). This option means that drivers using Victoria Park Road as a short cut will not be able to by-pass the planters by using Morden Road and Oates Road. This will make the roads around the primary school safer and less congested at busy times, whilst vehicle access to all properties will be maintained.

Option E - Closure on Victoria Park Road near Namu Road (option B or C) and add additional closure on the junction of Vicarage Road and Morden Road (shown in figure 2 on the map) and add no entry into Vicarage Road from Wimborne Road (shown in figure 3 on the map). By moving the planters, traffic should be reduced on all these roads, which will create a quieter and safer environment around the school, and for people walking/wheeling/cycling along Victoria Park Road – particularly senior school children heading to Glenmoor and Winton Academies.

Stopping vehicles from entering Vicarage Road from Wimborne Road should reduce conflict on Vicarage Road outside the primary school, which isn’t really wide enough for two-way traffic plus on-street parking. It should also ease traffic flow on Wimborne Road as there won’t be vehicles turning in.

Have your say

This consultation has now closed.

Background Information

Following a request from Government to install emergency active travel measures, as a response to the COVID pandemic, BCP Council introduced an Experimental Traffic Regulation Order (ETRO) to create a low traffic neighbourhood (LTN) in Victoria Park Road in August 2020. The experimental junction closure was implemented on Victoria Park Road, between the junctions with Oates Road and Namu Road. The closure applied to motorised traffic only, so people were still able to walk, wheel and cycle through. The closure was designed to reduce the number of vehicles cutting through the area, and create a quieter, safer environment for residents and for people, including school children, to cycle, scoot and walk through.

Consultation has been ongoing since the introduction of the ETRO and the council would now like to carry out engagement with local residents, businesses and organisations to understand their views on options for alternative measures which could be introduced.

Consultation carried out in the six month review period that followed the introduction of the original ETRO indicated that the closure in its current form/location does not have overall public support. However, within more recent feedback, there is evidence of growing support and also overall support for the principle of an LTN, hence the proposal to consult on alternative measures. Generally people felt that it was a good idea to reduce motor traffic along Victoria Park Road and the roads around the primary school. However, people felt that the planters were in the wrong place as drivers were simply diverting around them on even less suitable roads (Morden/Oates). Two reports summarising the findings of the feedback from the six month review (Scheme Review and Six month report) are available.

Why create a low traffic neighbourhood in Victoria Park?

Low traffic neighbourhoods foster a stronger sense of community, it’s quieter, and generally more pleasant. Safer routes to schools also mean that parents are more likely to let children travel to school independently

Victoria Park Road is used by motor vehicles taking a short cut between the A347 (Boundary Road) and Wimborne Road. By discouraging through traffic we are creating space where people can cycle, wheel and walk more safely, as well as making the area quieter and healthier.

With more people taking to cycling and walking during the coronavirus lockdown these measures are being trialled in line with the government’s latest Gear Change policy, which is a bold vision for cycling and walking. Victoria Park Road forms part of the east-west cycle route from Bearwood to Moordown, via West Howe and Ensbury Park. This cycle route also connects to Bournemouth University's Talbot campus and Glenmoor and Winton Academies.

The scheme at Victoria Park will also support children and parents travelling to and from schools by making it easier and safer for people to travel to school by bike and on foot, reducing the need to travel by car.

Promoting walking and cycling helps us to contribute towards tackling the council’s declared climate emergency and to enable people to make journeys to work, school, and for leisure, by bicycle or on foot instead of using cars as contained in the Local Transport Plan.

Will this make the main roads even busier?

Yes and no. Studies from other places where many of these sorts of schemes have been done previously show that in the short term, the surrounding roads may see a slight increase in traffic. However, in the longer term, this is dispersed and the effect on nearby main roads is minimal. This is because the changes are the nudge that some people need to reduce the number of journeys they make by car, so overall car trips are reduced in the area. Main road traffic flow can also be smoothed as there are fewer vehicles turning in and out of side roads.

How are the changes being funded?

The government has awarded local authorities Active Travel Funding to introduce measures to help increase the number of journeys completed by walking and cycling. This is so that everyone can enjoy the benefits to health, air quality and reduction in congestion.

What happens next?

We will now engage with local residents and businesses on the options proposed above. A decision on which option should be taken forwards, following consideration of the engagement results, will be made by the Cabinet Member for Transport and Sustainability in consultation with local Ward Members. Should any of the options to adjust the current measure be selected, a new ETRO will be advertised and installed for a minimum period of 6 months, otherwise arrangements to remove the current closure will be initiated.

For any new ETRO, subject to the ongoing consultation, after a point of no less than 6 months, a full report on the findings and outcomes of the ETRO will be presented to the Cabinet Member for Transport and Sustainability, who will make a decision on whether the changes should be made permanent, retained (with minor alterations), or removed. The experimental order can also be maintained for further review, up to a maximum period of 18 months.

What is a low traffic neighbourhood?

A low traffic neighbourhood is a group of residential streets, bordered by main roads (used by buses, lorries and non-local traffic travel), where through motor vehicle traffic is discouraged or removed using road closures. Every resident can drive onto their street and deliveries can be made, but it’s harder or impossible to drive straight through from one main road to the next.

What measures could be introduced?


Option A – Remove current experimental junction closure. This would mean that there wouldn’t be any measures to create a low traffic neighbourhood.

Option B – Keep current experimental junction closure at its current location. If it is decided to keep this measure in its current location, the temporary planters, road markings and signage can be upgraded to be made permanent.

Option C - Move closure to the other side of Namu Road (shown in figure 1 on the map). This would create less conflict with vehicles exiting Namu Road and would also provide more opportunity for a landscaped closure if made permanent.

Option D - Closure on Victoria Park Road near Namu Road (option B or C) and add additional closure on the junction of Vicarage Road and Morden Road (shown in figure 2 on the map). This option means that drivers using Victoria Park Road as a short cut will not be able to by-pass the planters by using Morden Road and Oates Road. This will make the roads around the primary school safer and less congested at busy times, whilst vehicle access to all properties will be maintained.

Option E - Closure on Victoria Park Road near Namu Road (option B or C) and add additional closure on the junction of Vicarage Road and Morden Road (shown in figure 2 on the map) and add no entry into Vicarage Road from Wimborne Road (shown in figure 3 on the map). By moving the planters, traffic should be reduced on all these roads, which will create a quieter and safer environment around the school, and for people walking/wheeling/cycling along Victoria Park Road – particularly senior school children heading to Glenmoor and Winton Academies.

Stopping vehicles from entering Vicarage Road from Wimborne Road should reduce conflict on Vicarage Road outside the primary school, which isn’t really wide enough for two-way traffic plus on-street parking. It should also ease traffic flow on Wimborne Road as there won’t be vehicles turning in.

Have your say

This consultation has now closed.

Background Information

Following a request from Government to install emergency active travel measures, as a response to the COVID pandemic, BCP Council introduced an Experimental Traffic Regulation Order (ETRO) to create a low traffic neighbourhood (LTN) in Victoria Park Road in August 2020. The experimental junction closure was implemented on Victoria Park Road, between the junctions with Oates Road and Namu Road. The closure applied to motorised traffic only, so people were still able to walk, wheel and cycle through. The closure was designed to reduce the number of vehicles cutting through the area, and create a quieter, safer environment for residents and for people, including school children, to cycle, scoot and walk through.

Consultation has been ongoing since the introduction of the ETRO and the council would now like to carry out engagement with local residents, businesses and organisations to understand their views on options for alternative measures which could be introduced.

Consultation carried out in the six month review period that followed the introduction of the original ETRO indicated that the closure in its current form/location does not have overall public support. However, within more recent feedback, there is evidence of growing support and also overall support for the principle of an LTN, hence the proposal to consult on alternative measures. Generally people felt that it was a good idea to reduce motor traffic along Victoria Park Road and the roads around the primary school. However, people felt that the planters were in the wrong place as drivers were simply diverting around them on even less suitable roads (Morden/Oates). Two reports summarising the findings of the feedback from the six month review (Scheme Review and Six month report) are available.

Why create a low traffic neighbourhood in Victoria Park?

Low traffic neighbourhoods foster a stronger sense of community, it’s quieter, and generally more pleasant. Safer routes to schools also mean that parents are more likely to let children travel to school independently

Victoria Park Road is used by motor vehicles taking a short cut between the A347 (Boundary Road) and Wimborne Road. By discouraging through traffic we are creating space where people can cycle, wheel and walk more safely, as well as making the area quieter and healthier.

With more people taking to cycling and walking during the coronavirus lockdown these measures are being trialled in line with the government’s latest Gear Change policy, which is a bold vision for cycling and walking. Victoria Park Road forms part of the east-west cycle route from Bearwood to Moordown, via West Howe and Ensbury Park. This cycle route also connects to Bournemouth University's Talbot campus and Glenmoor and Winton Academies.

The scheme at Victoria Park will also support children and parents travelling to and from schools by making it easier and safer for people to travel to school by bike and on foot, reducing the need to travel by car.

Promoting walking and cycling helps us to contribute towards tackling the council’s declared climate emergency and to enable people to make journeys to work, school, and for leisure, by bicycle or on foot instead of using cars as contained in the Local Transport Plan.

Will this make the main roads even busier?

Yes and no. Studies from other places where many of these sorts of schemes have been done previously show that in the short term, the surrounding roads may see a slight increase in traffic. However, in the longer term, this is dispersed and the effect on nearby main roads is minimal. This is because the changes are the nudge that some people need to reduce the number of journeys they make by car, so overall car trips are reduced in the area. Main road traffic flow can also be smoothed as there are fewer vehicles turning in and out of side roads.

How are the changes being funded?

The government has awarded local authorities Active Travel Funding to introduce measures to help increase the number of journeys completed by walking and cycling. This is so that everyone can enjoy the benefits to health, air quality and reduction in congestion.

What happens next?

We will now engage with local residents and businesses on the options proposed above. A decision on which option should be taken forwards, following consideration of the engagement results, will be made by the Cabinet Member for Transport and Sustainability in consultation with local Ward Members. Should any of the options to adjust the current measure be selected, a new ETRO will be advertised and installed for a minimum period of 6 months, otherwise arrangements to remove the current closure will be initiated.

For any new ETRO, subject to the ongoing consultation, after a point of no less than 6 months, a full report on the findings and outcomes of the ETRO will be presented to the Cabinet Member for Transport and Sustainability, who will make a decision on whether the changes should be made permanent, retained (with minor alterations), or removed. The experimental order can also be maintained for further review, up to a maximum period of 18 months.

Victoria Park Road

3 months

Drop a pin on the map to let us know what solutions you think would help create a low traffic neighbourhood in Victoria Park Road.

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CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded.
Page last updated: 21 September 2021, 08:39